Diary of a Nurse(ing student)
nurse-life:

MY GENERAL REACTION THESE DAYS TO BODILY FLUIDS AND NUDITY

nurse-life:

MY GENERAL REACTION THESE DAYS TO BODILY FLUIDS AND NUDITY

The only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking. Don’t settle. As with all matters of the heart, you’ll know when you find it.
Steve Jobs (via onlinecounsellingcollege)
nurse-cait:

This has gotten me through some tough times.  Quitting is easy but the reward doesn’t last.  Stick through it and you’ll have years of being thankful you did!!

nurse-cait:

This has gotten me through some tough times.  Quitting is easy but the reward doesn’t last.  Stick through it and you’ll have years of being thankful you did!!

Some days I’m a glorified waitress. Some days people would die without me.
@Nurse_Problems (via nelsonkellie)
phiairmed:

Shout out to all the nurses on Tumblr!

phiairmed:

Shout out to all the nurses on Tumblr!

The inconvenient truth of my life right now is that it will essentially feel like 110 degrees for the last weekend I have free of studying and course work. Bad timing Mother Nature!

hey there! nursing student here. I am going into my third year of nursing and i am... well liking everything so far. One thing has kept me puzzled though. I always asked myself what does a nurse really do? I've learned in school that if doctors treat, nurses care. But even care is too vague of a word. I somehow can't really define what a nurse does because they are capable of a lot of things. In your own definition, what does a nurse do?
Anonymous

dancingnurse-ed:

Hi, Anon,

An intriguing question. I agree, it can be puzzling, attempting to articulate what nurses do - particularly in Nursing School, where you are bombarded with information, theories, and practical work, which seems to negate any textbook or lecture material. As frustrating as this sounds, the visual picture starts to fall into place, once you are a graduate RN.

I thought about this question for a couple of days, (and it did honestly stump me a bit). After having simply observed my colleagues, and reflected on my own day to day workings, here’s what I came up with; anticipation. We anticipate life, and we anticipate death. What a nurse actually does is not limited to skills, medication safety or critical thought process, but the space that largely resides between. We are the foundation that supports the patient, connects the interdisciplinary team, the mediator between patients, their families, and healthcare providers, the fiercest of lions when quality of care is threatened by hospital bureaucracy, we are a friend and sometimes family substitute, we are the patient’s advocates when they lack a voice, we guide people through the most difficult stages of their life, and a solid rock of comfort and support when they take their final breath. A bedside nurse is responsible and accountable for a multitude of skills & tasks, specific to training, hospital policy and unit requirements. The nurse’s job, in simplistic terms, which is to say the utmost important, is in the very basics of care, communication, and collaboration with the doctors, social workers, case managers, nursing assistants, other nurses, physical therapists, respiratory therapists, to optimize a patient’s outcome.

The concept of care can perhaps be perceived as deliberate on a macro level (as a unified vision), or, more specifically on a micro level, the very core of our being - the individualized meaning in all that we do, nursing or otherwise.

My own personal definition of what a nurse actually does is really not comparable to some of the more inspirational thoughts of our nursing predecessors. Nursing continues to evolve, although the words of the founder of nursing are some of my favorite, and most eloquent description of what nursing, and medicine comprise of;

“It is often thought that medicine is the curative process. It is no such thing; medicine is the surgery of functions, as surgery proper is that of limbs and organs. Neither can do anything but remove obstructions; neither can cure; nature alone cures. Surgery removes the bullet out of the limb, which is an obstruction to cure, but nature heals the wound. So it is with medicine; the function of an organ becomes obstructed; medicine so far as we know, assists nature to remove the obstruction, but does nothing more. And what nursing has to do in either case, is to put the patient in the best condition for nature to act upon him.”

― Florence Nightingale, Notes on Nursing: What It Is, and What It Is Not.

Thank you for writing, I wish you all the very best as you enter your third year of nursing. I would be interested to hear your thoughts as you progress - keep me apprised, if you have a chance.

nursingdiary:

So much of this is true…

nursingdiary:

So much of this is true…

Hey! Freshman nursing student here. I'm wondering what are some good sources for studying other than notes. I've seen anatomy flash cards and coloring books and that's the class I'm worried about passing. I hear it's difficult. What would you suggest for studying?

Hi! As far as anatomy studying goes, I understand how it can be very intimidating. Personally, I’m a kinesthetic learner so I found it helpful to work with the displays in our lab to be able to understand how everything fit and was placed. I really found the coloring books to take too much time but they can be good. Probably the best advice is to focus on a system-by-system approach, head to toe. Doing it this way will also be very helpful later on when you’re doing assessments!

Thank You Notes: Nursing School edition

Thank you, nursing school, for reminding me why naps were invented.
Thank you for relieving me of the feeling I used to have that everything needed to be perfect to qualify as having been done satisfactorily. Thank you for reminding me that there is such a thing as too much effort and it leads to burn-out. Thank you for showing me the value of time…and how it will seem plentiful compared to money. Thank you for reminding me to laugh, often, because crying is the only alternative. Thank you for making me appreciate friends more than ever, especially the ones who understand why I don’t have time for them anymore. And finally, thank you, nursing school, for shaping me into a tough, resilient, future nurse who knows I wouldn’t trade an easy life for a fulfilling one.